Dinner or deadly – foraging for fungi

Nature’s larder is abundant with fruits, plants and fungi. In the woods you’ll find lots to eat, lots to avoid and many things with medicinal properties so it’s time to go framing for fungi. With a bushcraft expert, an adventure in autumn woodland proved to be a fascinating experience.

We’re fishing ourselves out of existence

With COP28 fast approaching, what is the real state of our planet now? Not the sanitised version which our politicians would have us believe as an excuse for their inaction, but the reality. In the third in this series on environment, climate change and conservation, Martin Hartley looks at the current state of our planet and how climate impacts are being felt today around the world.

Climate photography today

A tale of two oceans. Photography is at the forefront of documenting changes in our climate. Both the Arctic and Antarctic Oceans are important markers of both change and the rate of change. In the second feature in this series, Martin Hartley takes a look at the contrasting way these two oceans have been and are being documented.

Our planet – earth in focus

Martin Hartley is an adventure and expedition photographer. In the course of his work he visits some of the most extreme and fragile parts of our planet, often with scientists, anthropologists and climate journalists. For him, climate change is real and evident. In this series he examines the issues around climate, conservation and the people and environments affected by it.

Responsible Photography in Conservation

An Elephant silhouetted by the sun setting behind the imposing Oloololo Escarpment in Mara North Conservancy. Elephant populations are a conservation success story of the last 30 years. Although still lower than it was 50 years ago, the population is now increasing annually thanks for conservation initiatives. Despite this, it is important not to become complacent, as increasing populations lead to more human-wildlife conflict with elephants destroying crops and being pushed closer to settlements.

Travel and wildlife photographer Matthew Williams-Ellis talks about photographing wildlife in a responsible way in Kenya’s Masai Mara in support of the Mara Predator Conservation Programme

Living Planet report

Our planet is changing, and too fast! The World Wildlife Fund (WWF) has recently publish a report on the state of our planet’s wildlife, and the impacts of climate change on biodiversity. So what does it reveal?

Imminent death in paradise

Big Island, Hawaii

Hawaii is synonymous with palm fringed beaches against a volcanic backdrop. It’s a holiday destination but also a wild place. However, this wild side is under threat.

Pristine nature versus ‘real’ nature

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Wildlife photographer Tim Plowden argues that we are part of rather than separate from nature and captures the fine line between humans and the hornbills near his home in Singapore.

On thin ice

TPOTY 2019 Winners

“There is nothing more beautiful than ice in all its forms. I aim to show the abstract beauty drawn by nature – its power but also the fragility of the ecosystem.”

Storm chaser: Dangerous landscapes

TPOTY 2020 Winners

“We chase where the weather takes us; we could be in Texas one day, then drive all night and get to Wyoming for the next day.”

Save the salt

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The legendary Bonneville salt flats, home to many a land speed-record attempt, is in danger of disappearing. One US advertising photographer took this as his cue to create a campaign to help save it.